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the run of the mill goblin. >> dr. phil why don't you shut the [ bleep ] up, you bald headed big mouthed hill billy? >> sil oncould youel, you, my friend are a [ bleep ]. that is the nicest thing anyone has said about me. i have a bit of a lump now. >> my asian orthodontist says jessica beil has horse teeth. >> david arquette got old that. is right. it happens. >> kirstie alley is a dirty whore. there. i said it. >> thank you. >> adam scott... >> it's so fun to be in the public eye. that is your last call. go to gretawire.com. tell us what you thought about tonight's show. go to gretawire.com. but don't tweet me like that. >> dana: hello, i'm dana perinobe with kimberly guilfoyle, bob beckel, eric bolling, rambunctious greg gutfeld. it's 5:00 in new york city. this is "the five." ♪ ♪ >> dana: the gun debate continues to rage in washington and is now reportedly at the top of president obama's priority list. today, vice president biden met with gun control groups and gun violence victims. tomorrow he is going to sit down with the nra. the administration looks to move quickly, e
to be eliminated. i understand majority of people don't belief that. >> dana: the white house says they don't believe that. >> bob: i know. they don't go far enough. that is not the point. they are sitting down with the nra. i think the chances of carrying a bill through congress on this issue, the reason they -- they don't want the memory of newtown to go away. >> dana: politico reported that the administration, this is their top priority, they will get it done. i understand. i said after the newtown shooting that this could be action forcing event, that they try to get something done. do you think there is a possibility that the white house, given vice president biden's comments don't want legislation passed but they want republicans to voice opposition to legislation, so they can brow-beat them over the head with it. >> eric: i think they are going to try -- my personal view is first of all, can i address something you said, bob. they really should use executive order because they'd never get it through congress. isn't what the country is founded on? the constitution. two days ago you sa
'reilly to find out. but either way, you will be richer for it. you don't have to be the octomom. you could be anyone else. just forget killing kennedy or "killing lincoln." what i'm telling you, well, it's killing you. see you at 8:00 on fbn. if you don't get it -- >> demand it! >> eric: hello. i'm eric bolling with andrea tantaros, bob beckel, dana perino, greg gutfeld. it's 5:00 in new york city. this is "the five." ♪ ♪ >> eric: flip on the tv you better have fox news on, but if you change the channel, there is crazy stuff in tv land these days. check out "all my babies' momma" with a reality show starring a rapper sean lowe and ten women with his kids. >> in atlanta he is known for having 11 kids and ten babies' mommas. ♪ >> they say i'm the first lady. the baby momma with the most power because i control sean's finances. everybody good? amanda, the jealous baby bombma. >> yeah, whatever. you better listen. >> it's scheduled to air this spring on the oxygen network, creating controversy already. some claiming it's an attack on african-american families. but folks before you go lib
not -- >> bob: how do you go to work with the flu? >> andrea: here is the thing. i don't like flu shots either. i got one ten years ago and i got the flu so bad for two weeks. it already got it this year -- i already got it this year. >> eric: there will r a lot of -- put hit the way. interesting information out there you may or may not know we will throw around a few questions to the table. answer some of the questions. question number one. in normal flu season how many americans will be infected? >> dana: 226,000. >> kimberly: you saw the card. you always do that. >> eric: i can't see so i go like this. >> kimberly: she knew we were going to have a quiz. >> andrea: totally. >> dana: i read it on the thing. >> eric: on average, 226,000. how many hospitalizations? there are between 3,000 and 49,000 deaths occur each year. >> kimberly: scary. >> eric: move to question number two. can you contagious before, during or after you experience symptoms of the flu? >> andrea: all three. >> during. >> kimberly: before. >> dana: before. >> eric: all of them. the answer is most healthy adults according to
laden was shot in the head. should we release them? i don't know. >> obama: photos of someone being shot in the head floating around. >> cenk: let 'em go, let 'em go. and historic as usual, global warming all over the united states and now it's costing business in mississippi. and then we have a person who is an activist for the dream act and then all of a sudden her mother gets picked up by the authorities. get a look at this reaction. [ sobbing ] >> cenk: she's going to be on the show today. and then finally here we go again, another republican talking about legitimate rape. >> it is true. we tell couples all the time who are having trouble consuming because of the woman not ovulating, just relax. >> cenk: now wait until you find out the number of women who get pregnant because of rape in america. it's a stunning number. this is a stunning show. go time. [ ♪ music ♪ ] >> cenk: all right we got some good news about afghanistan, and the good news is we're leaving. president obama met with hamid karzai, the leader of afghanistan. >> the forces i have ordered to afghanistan have served
a book called "killing unicorns." i get the unicorn. they don't. by the way, how many people are fans or "red eye." [cheers] >> all right. this whole unicorn thing got out of hand. the reason why i was talking about unicorns in the beginning of the show was i thought it would be odd and weird if a middle aged man would obsess with something a teenage girl would be, and i thought as a conservative, libertarian, it would be interesting to create like false narratives about you that would kind of throw off the left. if you assign certain kinds of behaviors to yourself, they don't know what to make of you. i learned this when i was at the huffington post, that i created this whole falls story behind me, that i lived with a flight instructor named scott. and he was never home. and there would always be some kind of weird stench in the basement, and i wrote this stuff because the left wasn't used to dealing with somebody who was messing with them. in the world of left and right, the right was always what i would call the dean wormer, from animal house. they delighted in that. my goal in lif
, we'll give it to you to do the background check and give it to you to sell things we don't want sold at gun shows. they think they will bring the business to them. get those groups on board. if you have wal-mart and bass pro shoppous have a conservative shopper there. it's an interesting tactic. make a quick point. the obama administration is selectively picks its issues it wants to go after and the one it doesn't. arizona decided they had their own immigration law. the department of justice says no, no, you can't do that. we'll sue you. arizona sues arizona. they will enforce the federal law, not the arizona law. pot in colorado, pot in washington state, you have your own law there. we'll look the other way on your law there. because they don't care about it. >> andrea: california. >> eric: not so much california. but the point they want guns. they want to go after guns so they will find a way, find an tissue go and really beef up the gun control. >> andrea: they also shrekively picked their allies, bob, right? >> bob: what administration doesn't pick issues they want to go after? >
', right? you did good, huey. i need eight hours, mom. if i don't get eight hours, my immune system crashes. record a demo, something more up-tempo. something i can get on the radio. let's go! let's go! work it out with huey. let's go! go! go! i hate that-- kids--always hogging your attention. hi. hi. birthday girl. oh! yeah, yeah, happy birthday. is this demo thing for real? she's about to sign you! i can feel it in my bones. rocket to the moon, baby! rocket to the moon! oh, my. are you really tommy gunn's daughter? seriously. can you hold my purse, please? yeah. thanks. well, i guess there is a certain family resemblance. all his guitars are in there? yeah, you wanna come see for yourself? yeah. uh... can you just wait here just one second, please? thank you. yeah. [ male announcer ] one pharmacist started it all: charles walgreen had a mission to help people be happy and healthy. from inventing the first chocolate malt... to creating a nonprofit pharmacy for our troops... to the first child safety caps. walgreens has been innovating for over a hundred years. and we're just getting starte
arguments from anti-gun advocates is that we don't need more guns. but sometimes guns save lives. two in georgia gaz whose home was invaded. it happened 30 miles from atlanta. when the person broke in the hid in the crawl space. when the suspect found them she shot him. it didn't kill him but sent him fleeing. because she was able to have that weapon she was able to save herself and her kids. he is currently under hospital under police custody. >> eric: that is whole point. gun control people, a lot of people say let's make it harder and more difficult. register every gun. they want to do all these things. problematic is what you are doing you are making it more difficult for law abiding citizens who want to have guns protect themselves like this lady and countless of hundreds of thousands that protect their own property and stuff from bad guys, hurt them. you inhibit them from getting guns and allow criminals to get guns. last i checked, heroin and cocaine are illegal, right? people still get heroin and cocaine, bad guys are getting it and they are breaking the law. >> so heroin and
myself from something what that woman went through. but i don't want my ability to be hampered by the government. so i have an open mind. i don't feel as strongly as some people. >> kimberly: quick stepping on the constitution. we shouldn't run scared from bad guys. they can get these guns at a gun show regardless. >> bob: what i would like to do, i've got some numbers. he cites this two million people a year, save themselves from gun violence. can we bring up the stat study. guns are used in self-defense two million times a year, that is average of 5480 times per day and that is northwestern school of law. its nice story about this lady. i wonder if eric you could name me the other 5,000 that would protected that same day. >> you pulled up a stat that millions of people are saving their lives by owning guns. >> bob: that story got into the paper. i want to know, that is newsworthy story. the idea of two million people is bogus and it is a lie. >> it's from northwestern law school. >> bob: and they are lying. and writer of that was..., it's 5,480. i want to know where it is. >>
are not going to want to come as somebody's deputy. i don't know how they're going to fill out the lew treasury department, but i expect they will take some care and attention to tending those relationships. but when you look at the big guns on wall street, they're not going to go in as somebody's number two. >> john, was jack lew the first and only choice? >> that's been the principal focus of speculation from the beginning. i remember having a conversation with roger altman who is a friend of this program and somebody that served in the clinton administration about after the election how the president was going to fill out his cabinet. and he said if you look at the pattern that this president has followed, it has tended to pick people close to him who he feels very comfortable with. the criticism of president obama from some is that he's insular and that he has a very close circle. the positive of that is that it's a pretty cohesive group and he deals with people that he's comfortable with. and jack lew is clearly one of those people. >> you know, john, i know when you read the "new york tim
, is he not white enough? i don't care if he's trying to get attention or not you're a journalist and supposed to put things out that people want to hear. >> sean: great comments. greta is next, see you tomorrow. >> tonight, is president obama doing a power grab, bypassing congress to do just what he wants to do, cutting out the co-equal branch of congress. and newt gingrich is here to talk about the potential for power grab. "on the record" starts now. >> a bunch of liberal democrats worried about guns talking about using executive orders, what could it possibly be about? a gun grab. >> the president is going to pact through executive orders, executive action can be taken. >> if you have a president who thinks that executive orders trump the constitution, it doesn't really matter how many americans think that the constitution guarantees them the right to own a gun. >> the latest on a gruesome murder trial underway in phoenix right now. >> she already said, i did it, so the only thing that the jury is trying to determine here is was this really self-defense. >> how he treated her
, because i don't. and not because i'm busy, because i'm not. i just have not seen any of these movies. >> none of them? >> i'm going to hook you up from some screeners. >> thank you. my opinions are soly based on -- i do read a lot and all of the reviews. >> we're so glad you're with us here for the segment. go have some brunch over there. >> bye. >> did you see lincoln at least? >> i actually did not see "lincoln." >> an entertainment guru. >> exactly. i would have picked "django" because it's one of my favorite films of the year. i just don't see that happening. what daniel day lewis did in transforming himself and how beautiful the film is, just to look at, it's got a pretty good shot. >> academy loves movies like that. >> big fancy. >> and the whole package. >> the hollywood dream. >> and it was an election year. >> wow! let's move on and hope that some of the panel has seen some of these next movies. best motion picture comedy or musical. savannah, jason and michelle all say "les mis" maybe the favorite. tamron, you and i like "silver linings playbook." >> i like the movie becaus
and social security barcia you don't want to pay our billions you do that in public. we're not even going to talk to you. the white house i think is going to buck up and do what the left wants. in terms of the debt limit, it's a sequester where you're going to see a lot more of a messy -- andrea: on the debt limit, is the white house prepared to actually go over that limit and >> i think they think in the end -- andrea: another game of chicken. >> the republicans always say they won't do it. of course we won't default. but then they -- >> and you've got a house speaker who has been threatened here. and he now has that right flank. and he's going to stand firm. and the polls show in the country by the way, that when you ask people would you like some balance, which everyone seems to be talking about, the answer is yes. and they understand that they got this -- the tax issue done so now they're going to look at spending cuts. andrea: gloria, i want to show all of us something here. just to remind us of a different time. this is an image that says a lot about what washington used to be. tom
, but by almost any measurement, somewhere between three and eight million more will lose their homes if woe don't do something. so, i'd argue, it's not in the rearview mirror. in fact it's in front of us. who bears the cost or what's the consequence? there's lots of consequences, obviously. first and foremost, families who are disrupted and taken from their homes. and it's worth thinking about the numbers. we're talking tree or four our five million more families. that's as many as 20 million more americans. why it's a problem? mike alluded to. when you're underwater, your behavior changes. you don't spend as much money oning in. the only thing you consume more of is healthcare because are in the stress, look at the numbers, that goes up. so the costs are significant, both the families, and i'd argue to society, and obviously the communities in which these people live. foreclosures cost both hard dollars and soft dollars. there are property tax issues, and the consequences felt by all of us. >> mr. miller, do you have anything to add to that? in particular, road blocks to solutions. >> i don't
with this administration. first of all on what would make a difference. we don't think a ban on so-called assault weapons which hasn't worked in the past will work this time. >> one of the major pieces the vice president appears to be focused on is not the assault weapons ban but background checks. >> there's a surprising -- so far, a surprising recurrence of suggestions that we have universal background checks. not just close the gun show loophole but total universal background checks, including private sales. >> and the "washington post" reports today the white house is at least considering an nra proposal to fund police in schools, that's something now being pushed by democratic senator barbara boxer. i want to bring in "washington post" columnist ruth marcus and ryan grim. good to see you both. >> good morning. >> the nra said and i'm quoting here, we were disappointed with how little this meeting had to do with keeping our children safe and how much it had to do with an agenda to attack the second amendment. ruth, nobody thought the nra would come out of this meeting and say we've totally changed ou
will not negotiate over whether to raise the debt limit. why don't you believe him? >> well, i don't believe him for sort of practical reasons and partly for the history of his negotiating style. the practical reason is we have a couple of things coming up that he is clearly going to negotiate over, one of which is the sequester, the automatic spending cuts that they delayed for two months when they did the fiscal cliff deal. that is going to expire late february and early march. it is hard for them to say we are going to negotiate but don't call it a debt ceiling negotiation. we'll just call it a sequester negotiation. i think that is a difference without a distinction. i think what the president demonstrated in the end of the fiscal cliff negotiation and a couple of previous negotiations is he is a guy who wants a deal even when he is holding all the cards as he was in the fiscal cliff negotiation. he is not a guy who wants to tempt fate. he doesn't like chaos. he wants to get a deal. he wants both sides leaving the table thinking they got something. he wants to prove that washington can work.
take executive action. they are giving you an f rating with no sign of support from you. i don't think you mind that. >> no. >> would you mind executive action from the white house and the president? >> first of all, i don't know and it hasn't been specified what the vice president is talking about, but i welcome executive action and the president has executive power to take actions in these areas. i don't know what they specifically are and obviously we will look at that, but i welcome executive action in order to move quickly on the issues that will make a difference in the debate. >> to your point, peter alexander and the team of reporter who is cover the white house asking for more specifics on that. but it would likely point to what we have seen from the fiscal debate in congress. gridlock. you have mitch mcconnell on the sunday morning program saying the priority for congress are fiscal issues or gun control would be a back burner issue. whatever he meant by that point to way too many times in congress on big issues which is a gridlock. >> we shouldn't slow down and there shouldn
, don't go to your emergency room, call your doctor first. you catch this in the first couple of days, you can get an antiviral. carl, i think today you're going to start to see hospitals delay operations, tell people to get out of the hospital. this has not yet reached epidemic proportions, but that's going to be tossed around the next couple of days. >> we're going to get shots on this desk. dr. nancy snyderman, thanks. >>> meantime, emergency rooms in milwaukee, wisconsin, have seen a surge of flulike symptoms. kevin, good morning. >> yes, at the st. francis hospital, not only here in milwaukee, it's throughout the midwest. as we heard from dr. nancy, it's across the country. this particular milwaukee area, they are actually practicing something they are referring to as diversion where so many hospitals are filled with patients suffering from flu symptoms, they are actually sending ambulances hopscotching from here to there so people get the care. we're fortunate this morning to be joined by dr. cathy shallow. i guess the first question i want to ask is is this worse than, say, the
to lead the country. we don't know what is the final answer of what is unconstitutional, until there is a declaration from the supreme court. but the president has to do what needs the be done to get the job done. and president lincoln was using habeas to act now, and see what goes forward and the same for the president now, but as you said, there is real life consequence, because it is a big esoteric conversation, and one that we have ever everyday with the law student, but the point is that the president has to go forward and has to act. >> and are people asking him to do this? senate democrats have said to him, listen, what we have to do is to in fact ignore the republicans here. let's take a look at what the democrats have said. they are actually saying, listen, mr. president, this is the time when we hope that you will continue to ignore claims that agreeing to a rise in the debt ceiling will agree to the con kegs,ey -- concessio concession, and saying, do it, and we have to do it. >> and they are frustrated that the republicans are held hostage here and made demands and t
can always change it. >> of course, of course. >> why don't you do that. i would like that, i think. >> for her that would be nice, i think. >> and that shows virtually every place that it could be done. >> we were thinking horizontal, though. >> right. >> that one. >> it can go right across the top. >> right across this bar. >> that'd be beautiful, bob. >> because people can read it better. >> well, especially in the winter, you know? if it's down at the bottom and we get one of our michigan snowfalls, you know, it could be covered. the name could be covered when it's way down low like that. >> i saw so many times when death would occur and no plans had been made. and we discussed it from time to time, and finally decided on what we wanted. >> ...and show you the draft of the obituary for both you and jean. yours would read this way: "robert kelly was born on march the 10th, 1922, in el reno, oklahoma. he was the fifth of six children..." >> i know exactly what they're going to do-- one visitation, a mass, a cremation, burial, side by side. >> "...discharged in 1946, and that same
during the fiscal cliff negotiations. and you don't have to stare it to know they're all men. how much is an optics problem and how much is a very real problem? >> i think the majority of the problem is optical and also a communications issue. even if you look at the timing of the rollout, some of his previous nominees. look at the chuck hagel nominee. they've been hanging them out to dry essentially. and for members of congress to have their opportunity to throw shots at them. it's been rather interesting and rare that the transition has been so bumpy, especially for a president going into its second term. but, look, there's still a lot of turnover going into the cabinet. even though the president announce three cabinet members are staying on for a while. who knows if that's going to be six months, a year, two years. we'll see if he's going to nominate more women. i do believe he'll be under immense pressure to appointment the secretary of labor to succeed hill da solis. i want to bring in charlie rangel. congressman. >> to see you as always. first black president. he's getting questi
history program. >> we don't see you in these interviews. >> it's by choice. i remember going to a festival of the book and listened to david halberstam. it was 2005, 200 -- before i got that job. i'm not in it anymore. and he was talking about the best interview. he said the best interviewer disappears. and i thought what i would do was to disappear. that my job would be to help the interviewee recall events to encourage them and create a zone of comfort and to disappear. the goal was for this to be video that could be used for documentaries in the future as well as for use in the museum. you don't want to see me. >> in 1:32, alexander butterfield, you interviewed him in 2008, today he's 86 years old. let's watch. [video clip] >> he didn't go to the residence very often. when he left the office he went to the e.o.b. and he had dinner over there. four nights out of five. he only went to the residence if the young people were coming over, the children, with their spouses or boyfriend or girlfriend or whatever, or someone was going to be there, a friend. so otherwise when he lef
second amendment rightd to the american people.mehe amea we don't think that --n so why >> why shouldn't the american people ask both sides to sides to compromise? yes, you want increased sec compromise? schools, you want te you want increased security in h schools, you want the d gaming y proliferation of violence in thu gaming industry and media to w, come down, you want to deal with say yes to the mentally ill. if the pres if we say yes to that or the president says yes to that, why doesn't he have a right to say e to you give a little on things th like background checks?in check? >> you know, if you're -- if you' >> you know, if you're looking , at the problem, which is to prevent this sort of thing, wha you want to do is do those things that will actually make o those things that w difference.il actually we have a profound disagreement. we have a profound with this administration, first of all, on what would make a w of al difference.l,hat would we don't think that a ban on m. we don't think that so-called assault weapons, whic hasn't worked in the past, is h hasn't worked in
, first of all, on what would make a difference. we don't think that a ban on so-called assault weapons, which hasn't worked in the past, is going to work this time. we think many of those proposals are basically feel-good proposals and what we really need to do is get to the question of why this is happening and what can be done about it. i don't think there's any lack of concern about dealing with the problem. i think there's a very different view as to what the problem is and how to solve it. >> the president says he wants no single piece of legislation, he wants a broad approach. are you willing to go out on a limb and predict there -- do you have the support in congress to block any federal ban on assault weapons in the coming year? >> i do not think that there is going to be a ban on so-called assault weapons passed by the congress. >> how close do you think congress can get on that? people talk about the power of the nra. they look at it almost in monumental terms. do you think in the wake of these shootings that power has been eroded at all, mr. keene? >> i don't know that the n
there representing us on something called the intelligence committee? >> well, i just don't know how anybody could come to the conclusion that the country is a lot safer with michele bachmann having access to intel information. >> that's right. >> and will there be enough public support that could change her, that could remove her from the intel committee? >> probably not. i think boehner is so weakened, i don't think he would have the courage to do something like that, because i think we can't risk angering the far right wing. and there should be, ed. because as you point out, again, this is a woman who has already proven she can't be trusted with sensitive information, that she has no problem using it for her own political purposes, and she has no problem just talking off the cuff and saying all kinds of crazy things. >> karen finney, always a pleasure to have you "the ed show." that is "the ed show." i'm ed schultz. the rachel maddow show starts right now. good evening. >> good evening. thanks to you at home for staying with us this hour. in politics, the concept of low hanging fruit is somethi
says unilateral sanctions don't work and they just isolate the united states. republican critics, though, aren't convinced. >> he is an honorable man. he has had a record of distinguished service but he's profoundly wrong on a number of the most important national security issues that face our country today. >> reporter: key jewish groups being lobbied, that has helped soften the anti-defamation league, who wrote senator hagel would not have been my first choice, but i respect the president's prerogative. >> the white house is reaching out to a number of groups and individuals with regard to this nomination and others. >> reporter: hagel is also likely to face questions about his position on gay rights after his 1998 comments criticizing a u.s. ambassador nominee as, quote, openly aggressively gay. hagel has since apologized but one openly gay senator says she would like to hear more. >> i do want to speak to him particularly about his comments 14 years ago to see if his apology is sincere and sufficient. >> reporter: monday the white house faced protests but not over chuck hagel
-- you certainly don't want to leave things worse than you found them. and this is, of course, much of the consternation and the stress, i suspect, of people in afghanistan feeling post-2014. what is going to be left behind? will the peace and stability hold? what about the ongoing development projects that are in that country? and that has been true going back to second world war and beyond. so put it into the context of syria. who can make the most meaningful contributions now? and the contribution doesn't have to be military. russia, i would suggest, should be called upon to step up and belly up to the u.n. security council and exert influence. they, i suggest, are the most influential at this time. and have the ability, number one, to stop supporting this regime that is slaughtering its citizens, to stop by its acquiescence standing on the sidelines and letting it happen while the rest of the world wrings its hands and sucks its teeth. >> how do we accomplish that? >> well, pause i think they can -- because i think they can exert influence in the capital of syria. i think they'r
. if you do think you have influenza, please don't go to your emergency room where they are swamped with patients. call your doctor first. you catch this in the first couple of days, you can get an a antiviral. i think you will see hospitals tell people to get out of the hospital. this is going to be tossed around in the next couple of days. >> we will be getting our shots. thanks. >>> meantime, the milwaukee area has seen a surge in flu-like symptoms causing people to take emergency measures. kevin is at the st. francis hospital. good morning. >> reporter: yes. it's not only through milwaukee, throughout the midwest, as we heard from dr. nancy, it's across the country. here, they're practicing something known as diversion, where so many hospitals are filled with patients suffering from flu symptoms, they're actually sending ambulances hopscotching from here to there to make sure people get the care. we're fortunate this morning to be joined by one of the doctors here, dr. kathy shallow. i guess the first question i want to ask, is this worse than say the swine flu 2009? >> the swin
. they don't need to hit home runs but they don't need to strike out right now. right now we're overweight japan. we're overweight the eurozone, high yield corporate bond and emerging markets. we're underweight u.s. treasurys and investment grade corporate bonds. and right now we've shifted from overweight to neutral for u.s. equities and we're shifting those assets more into the, overweight areas that i just mentioned. ashley: all right. on the other side of this equation, bob, you're some what are of a cautious bear. let's put it that way. what are you most worried about in the new year? >> when you look at what is driving markets, no question there is upward trend has developed and we think will continue but all based upon the fed creating liquidity of the as long as the fed is buying $100 billion a month of mortgage-backed securities and treasurys and putting on that liquidity in the market it has to find a place to go and we think for now it will be into the equity markets. there was a slight increase in the 10-year-year-old yesterday. there is possibility also you could have machine
your business grow. and on twitter and don't forget to become a fan of the show on facebook. we love getting your feedback. next week, meet some auto repair guys who loved fancy sports cars but hate bookkeeping. that is until they discovered what they could do if they understood their finances. we'll tell you how paying attention to the numbers be a game-changer. until then, remember, we make your business our business! we've all had those moments. when you lost the thing you can't believe you lost. when what you just bought, just broke. or when you have a little trouble a long way from home... as an american express cardmember you can expect some help. but what you might not expect, is you can get all this with a prepaid card. spends like cash. feels like membership. >>> good morning, i'm chris hayes. the country will see more extreme weather. in the east, highs in the 50s. on the west coast, temperatures near freezing and severe storms are threatening the mississippi and ohio river valleys with flooding. and in egypt, a court has ordered a retrial for former president hosni mu
a local church group. gun buybacks are a simple idea. if you have a gun you don't want, a buyback program gives you a chance to get rid of it in a way that is safe and orderly and legal and calm. that gun in your life that you have not known what to do with, that you have been worried about, your friendly local buy-back program gives you way to put your mind at ease. get that unwanted gun out of your house. you hand over the gun. usually in exchange you get a smallish amount of cash or a gift card. but the larger attraction here really is that the gun gets taken off your hands and safely destroyed. in political terms, buy-backs are attractive because they're not a new law. they're not a new regulation. there is no coercion involved. they're not really even an attempt at persuasion. they're just offering people a resource to rid themselves of guns they don't want without risk in a safe, orderly way. it's a totally voluntary thing. since the mass shooting in newtown, connecticut, a month ago, buy-back programs in cities like camden, new jersey, and los angeles have broken records. no questi
you want to make sure is they don't get dehydrated. they have to take enough fluids in. a child who is getting better and turns for the worse, that could be a sign they have a bacterial infection on top of what else was going on. and shortness of breath. any child who has trouble catching their breath. in a young child, it could mean they have a weak cry. they need to be seen immediately. that's a danger sign. >> dr. besser, thank you. >>> to the white house, now. where president obama is firming up his team for the second term. this afternoon, he'll announce that white house chief of staff, jack lew, is his pick for treasury secretary. that means for the first time in years, all of the premier cabinet positions will be covered by money. jon karl is covering the shuffle in the white house. good morning, jon. >> reporter: good morning, george. some critics aring le inlooking emerging second-term cabinet and wondering, where are the women? today, jack lew for treasury secretary. earlier this week, chuck hagel for defense. and john brennan for cia. and before that, john kerry for secre
risk for a stroke. [ gps ] turn left. i don't think so. [ male announcer ] for years, bob took warfarin, and made a monthly trip to the clinic to get his blood tested. but not anymore. bob's doctor recommended a different option: once-a-day xarelto®. xarelto® is the first and only once-a-day prescription blood thinner for patients with afib not caused by a heart valve problem, that doesn't require routine blood monitoring. like warfarin, xarelto® is proven effective to reduce the risk of an afib-related stroke. there is limited data on how these drugs compare when warfarin is well managed. no routine blood monitoring means bob can spend his extra time however he likes. new zealand! xarelto® is just one pill a day, taken with the evening meal. and with no dietary restrictions, bob can eat the healthy foods he likes. do not stop taking xarelto® rivaroxaban without talking to the doctor who prescribes it for you. stopping may increase your risk of having a stroke. get medical help right away if you develop any signs or symptoms of bleeding, like unusual bruising or tingling. you may h
to do so for the overall u.s. economy, james. >> you know, you don't know. there's a lot of talk about letting it happen and the fiscal cliff that actually go over the cliff. on this one i'm a little less certain and a lot of times an event has to happen. ari will remember this well. remember, the talk first went down and the stock market lost 71 point and they came back in and it went up. i'm beginning to sense -- obviously i don't notice, that something bad might have to happen in order to get this reconciled and both sides are digging in pretty hard here. >> boehner in "the wall street journal" the other day actually said this. i'll read it to you, ari. it wasn't until literally last week that the white house brought up replacing the sequester. they were always counting on us to bring this to the table. the sequester is as much leverage as we're going to get. how big of a deal is this going to be? in other words, sequestration, the force, domestic spending cuts. they delayed it for two months but it will go into effect unless something is done. >> the sequester is the issue that rep
>> i think filmmakers do have a responsibility. i don't permit my children to watch a lot of things and i'm on it as much as i can. but, you know, as a filmmaker you also have to ask yourself, like, where is my line? >> reporter: the man who played rambo and made a career out of action movies, he thinks what's seen on the screen can spill over to reality. >> do films have an impact on people? yeah. >> reporter: he says he would hope movie violence comes with an underlying moral, but concedes that's not always the case. >> if you're going to do a film like that, that has that kind of violence, there has to be a certain morality that good triumphs over evil, and that it is not random. like, so many times we see in action films a guy runs in, he's after the bad guy, but four other people get killed in the subway and we never even look at them. oh, yeah, i've done it myself, boom. >> reporter: the soul searching in hollywood seems more genuine this time. but the question is, will it really have any impact on the kinds of movies that are being made? nischelle turner, cnn, hollywood. >> l
in terms of after began security forces, capacity to take the lead. i don't really know anything about the strength of afghan security forces and neither do you, unless you are just back from the war, which case, welcome home. but the pentagon's report to congress on that subject which reportedly was ready before the election this year, but did not get released until after the election for some reason, the official u.s. pentagon report on the readiness of afghan security forces, far from afghan security forces ready to take the lead, out of 23 afghan army brigades, only one of those 23 brigades capable of operating independently without support from international or u.s. troops. this is the graphic that says that. this is how the pentagon presents data that it doesn't want to make headlines, but i can interpret it for you. see the 23 i've circle there. the number of pri guides. how many can operate there independent with advisers? well, oh, 1. 1 of 23. even if you are bad at math, you can tell that's not good. the same report, the pentagon's own report showed after u.s. troop surge in
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